Wednesday, September 12, 2012

What Are the Implications of Dying Without a Will?




People who die without a valid will, die intestate. In this event, the state in which they resided effectively provides a will through the state's intestacy law. This means that the state dictates who will receive the estate owner's property and in what proportion.

While state intestacy laws do attempt to provide for a "fair" distribution of property, the state's "one-size-fits-all" will simply cannot reflect the specific wishes of the estate owner in regard to either property distribution or the unique needs of the estate owner's heirs.

In addition, state intestacy laws require that the probate court appoint a guardian for any minor children. The court-appointed guardian, who may not even be a relative, may be required to post bond and the guardianship will be supervised by the probate court.

Finally, when a person dies intestate, the probate court appoints an administrator of the estate. This administrator can be anyone of the court's choosing and is required to post bond, an additional expense that must be paid by the estate.

To view the entire NFS September '12 Estate Ideas, click here.

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